Thursday, September 27, 2018

Easy Pocket Pillow Cover

It's a bit early for me to swap out my summer bedroom for my fall/winter one but we are 'expecting' in October. . . 


so I feel like I better 'fluff the nest' NOW because I know I won't have any free time with a new 'baby' in the house!

I just finished a new banner for over our bed using burlap and flannel so I used some of the left over flannel, crochet medallions and scrap ticking fabric to create a pillow to match.


Take one old, ugly pillow and measure the length and width. This one was 17" long and 12" wide.  
Cut:  1 piece 2" longer (19" long and 14" wide)
Cut: 1 piece same width but 4" shorter (14" wide and 15" long)
Cut:  1 piece same width but 10" shorter (14" wide and 9" long")


You can leave the front plain or embellish it.  I chose to create two striped pieces and added a few crochet medallions.


Medallions were stitched just in the center, attaching them to the ticking fabric.


Ticking pieces were stitched to the front pillow section.


Create a 1/2" hem on the smaller, back piece.


Create a 1" hem on the larger, back piece.


Lay your pillow front FACE UP.  Lay the larger, back piece face down (so right sides of fabric are together) on the left.


 Next, lay the shorter, back piece on top of the longer back piece, again, right sides together with the front of the pillow cover.


Pin through all layers and stitch, using a 5/8" seam.  Note:  I tend to err on the side of a narrower seam.  It's always easier to go back around and make the cover SMALLER, rather than having to remove the stitching and make the cover BIGGER to fit the pillow.  If you measure correctly, a 5/8" seam should be just right though.


A little trick for getting nice, sharp corners:  Take two stitches across the corner, then turn and continue stitching down the side.  Do this on every corner.

Once you've stitched your cover, turn it inside out and fit your pillow form inside.  This doesn't have to be neat and pretty . . . you're just making sure the pillow cover will fit.  Once you know it will fit, turn it back inside out.


Trim all the seams and cut the corners off as shown.  This will help you get a nice, sharp edge when you turn the case back right side out.


My sewing teacher from nearly 50 years ago always told me the inside of my garment/project should always be as neatly finished as the outside.  I still hear her voice ringing in my ears when I'm tempted to skip finishing my seams!  This will keep them from unraveling (and make it pretty for those people who I'm sure are going to tip toe into the bedroom, remove the pillow cover and peek inside of it . . . hahaha!)


Pocket pillow covers are great! They're so easy and give a nice, finished cover that you can remove and wash and switch out with other covers for the seasons.


So I swapped out my seersucker duvet cover for my flannel and my white, crochet throw for my fur throw as well as my curtains and a few other things so now I'll be ready to focus on the new baby!


How are you getting ready for colder weather?  Or are you one of the lucky ones down south whose colder weather means brrrrrrrr..... temps in the 50's in December???

On any given week (depending on how busy I am!) I love to participate in Link Parties.  These gals put a lot of time and effort into hosting these parties so I always want to show my appreciation by directing my readers to these blogs. 

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Sunday, September 23, 2018

Burlap, Flannel, Doily Banner

 
 I haven't completely switched our bedroom over from summer to winter but decided I'd start small and just make a new banner for over the bed.
The summer one was made of all vintage doilies.
I found some burlap at an estate sale which was my inspiration for the banner.  I added some super soft flannel and pieces of vintage doilies to create this simple banner.
The burlap triangles were cut using a pattern that is 8.5" tall and 6" wide.  Be sure that when you cut these and the flannel that you leave about 3/4" extra at the top for folding over the ribbon or cording used to create the banner.

The flannel was cut 7.5" tall and 5" wide, also leaving that 3/4" at the top for folding.  I used pinking shears on the flannel but you don't need to do that.

As you know, burlap unravels very easily.  The first thing I did after cutting the triangles was to use a zig-zag stitch on all of the edges.  Since the top edge was going to get worked a little bit more and would be holding the triangle onto the cord, I actually stitched that edge twice.

If you look closely, you can see the zig-zag stitches on the piece on the right.  I tried to use a thread color close to the burlap color so it wouldn't stand out but you could definitely use a contrasting color and that would look nice as well.

I used Stitch Witchery to attached the flannel triangles on top of the burlap.  Simply lay a piece of SW on the burlap, lay the flannel on top and iron to adhere the burlap and the flannel.  I also used the SW to attach the doily medallions to the flannel.

I ironed the top edge of the banner pieces down before stitching over the ribbon.  It just made it easier to do and ensured the banner pieces would all end up the same size.

Using a straight stitch, I 'sandwiched' the ribbon in the fold I had created by ironing over the top edge.

That's all there is to it!  

There are so many possibilities using different fabrics and embellishments.  

I'll be switching out the duvet and pillow covers once we get into the really cold weather.  Thankfully we aren't at THAT point yet so for now, the banner is helping to EASE me into colder days!

On any given week (depending on how busy I am!) I love to participate in Link Parties.  These gals put a lot of time and effort into hosting these parties so I always want to show my appreciation by directing my readers to these blogs. 

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Sunday, September 9, 2018

Flannel Shirt Fall Coasters

I'm probably in the minority here but . . . I am not happy to see summer come to an end.  I've enjoyed taking the summer off from blogging, soaking in our extremely hot and dry summer, late nights in my gazebo, bike rides, outdoor concerts, grilling and eating outside and so much more! (So what do all of these things have in common? Yep, you can't do ANY of them around here in the winter!).  BUT, time marches on and fall is in the air so I'll concede and begin with a simple, inexpensive fall project!

What you'll need:
Flannel shirt or other medium weight fabric
Felt
Card stock or heavy paper for pattern 
Permanent marker or chalk 
Pinking Shears
You can use any fabric but I used an old, flannel shirt from Goodwill.  After washing and drying (You'll want to do this to any fabric you use.  If you don't preshrink, your coasters will wrinkle and shrink and distort if you decide to wash them.) I used a marker to trace my pattern onto the wrong side of the flannel.  I cut these with the pattern on the diagonal for interest.
My pattern was 4.25" square.  I cut two pieces of flannel for each coaster.
I used a silver marker to trace my smaller pattern onto the black felt.  
You'll need to cut one piece of flannel for each coaster.  They should be 3.75" square.
Sandwich and center the felt in between two pieces of flannel.  The flannel should be RIGHT sides OUT.
Stitch together using the 'feel' of the edge of the felt inside as your guide.  The fabric may shift giving you the uneven edges seen in the picture BUT, if you're following the felt square edge, that will give you a nice, even square.
Next, even the edges with pinking shears.  
Sew a seam from one corner to the other. Turn and do the same between the other two corners.
You could 'quilt' these with more lines if you want. I chose to just do these two lines of stitching.
I was able to make 18 coasters from one flannel shirt using the sleeves, fronts and back.
A great way to use those old flannels you may have laying around . . . simple, quick project!  If you need to or decide to wash these, the edges will fray nicely too!

How are you fluffing your nest for fall?  All at once or with just a few touches at a time?

On any given week (depending on how busy I am!) I love to participate in Link Parties.  These gals put a lot of time and effort into hosting these parties so I always want to show my appreciation by directing my readers to these blogs. 

Monday

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Sunday, July 22, 2018

Vintage Linen Owl


I love vintage linens! Sometimes the prettiest ones have stains that just won't come out.  Here's a great way to still get some life out of them . . . pin cushions.  When I saw this little owl, I fell in love and knew it would be perfect for this fabric I have.  The free pattern can be downloaded HERE.

Using the pattern provided, I cut out the pieces: The quarter circle is the body, the circle is the bottom and the triangle is the belly.  I used vintage curtain material for the body and this pretty embroidered runner for the belly because it was too stained to use for anything else.


I made sure to center the embroidered flower bouquet so it would be centered on the owl's belly.


You need to cut a circle of cardboard and a circle of fabric (the fabric circle is cut 1/2" larger).  With needle and thread, just gather and pull then stitch it so it stays gathered.


Stitch right sides together, the body and belly section.  (See that I had already stitched it WRONG . . . and had to rip it out and stitch it again!)


This fabric was unraveling a lot so I used a zig zag stitch so it wouldn't unravel.


Here it is turned right side out.


I didn't have any fiberfill so I just used some soft, jersey fabric scraps to stuff it.  Stitch along the bottom end and pull tight to hold in the filling.


Now stitch the fabric covered cardboard disk onto the bottom using a simple slip stitch all the way around.


The original instructions say to stitch the beak down.  I'm lazy.  I used a hot glue gun.


The directions also say to stitch the buttons on for the eyes.  I stitched them with the thread then hot glued them on so they LOOKED like they had been stitched on.


Isn't he so cute??


He makes an adorable pin cushion.  These would be cute for so many things!  Now I know what to do with the linen stash.  There are a lot of free patterns out there for pin cushions including these cute chicks which I think I'll try next!